3 Golden Rules
for Family and Friends
during a competition

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The best supporters in the world!

Rio 2016 Olympic Games

Louis Brochu (uncle), Roger Fortin (father), Mike Moffa (personal trainer), Evelyne Brochu (mother), Stéphane Larouche, Carole Malo (aunt), Hugo Lettre (physiotherapist), me, Sandra « sis » Ramirez Segura (friend) and Benoit Martel (1st trainer)

When your uncle comes to watch you box, is he a little too enthusiastic? Does your mother constantly interrupt your warm-up to take pictures of you and your coach? As much as you love your family members, do they sometimes get on your nerves a little?

If one of these scenarios seems vaguely familiar, this might be the perfect opportunity to nonchalantly leave your tablet open to this article on the corner of the kitchen counter – because it’s actually for them. ;)

• Be self-reliant.

Entertain yourself! Don’t rely on the athlete to be your guide during a competition. Athletes have a job to do and must stick to their routine as much as possible to perform well. If you need information, contact a team member (coach or other) who is not competing.

• Be available, but let the athlete come to you.

Remember that the periods between fights are not free time. These are times when athletes must prioritize their recovery, do video analysis with their coaches, and, of course, rest.

• Talk about anything but boxing!

Let the athlete bring up the topic of boxing. Otherwise, talk about the weather, the latest gossip or even the curtains or car you want to buy. And if you don’t know what to say, don’t say anything! This will prevent you from expressing yourself poorly or saying the wrong thing. In any case, whether it’s before a fight or after a defeat, there isn’t much to say. Your presence is enough.


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